Rocco, Rocky & Flint: Rock Names for Boys

by appellationmountain on January 4, 2013

A coastal rock formation that looks like...som...

A coastal rock formation (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Looking for a strong name for a boy?  A nature-inspired choice that feels unexpected and solid all at once?  Maybe you should turn towards geology – and guitars – and go with one of these rock names for a son.

Hollywood has embraced rock names over the past few years.  Madonna kicked things off, welcoming son Rocco with Guy Ritchie in 2000.  Then along came:

  • Gwen Stefani made headlines with her second son’s name, Zuma Nesta Rock, in 2008.
  • Johnny Knoxville and his wife Naomi went with Rocko Akira for their son in 2009.
  • Sarah Michelle Gellar and Freddie Prinze, Jr.’s son, Rocky James, born in 2012.

Famous namesakes abound:

  • Rocco is a saint, though his name comes from the Germanic element hrok - rest.  He’s also known as Roch.
  • Rocky is a boxer – Rocco Marciano was a heavyweight title holder, plus there’s fictional Robert Balboa, the underdog-turned-American icon from the Rocky franchise.
  • He’s a flying squirrel, too – Rocket Squirrel, better known as Rocky, from The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show.
  • Rock Hudson was a leading man in the 1950s and 60s – though he was born Roy.
  • Professional wrestler-turned-actor Dwayne Johnson is better known as The Rock; his dad was a wrestler called Rocky.

Ready for the rock names?

Names That Mean Rock

Peter – The ultimate rock name with Biblical roots, from the Greek petros - rock.  Variants abound: Pierce, Piers, Pierre, Per, and Pedro to name a few, plus feminine forms like Petra and Petronella.

Craig – The Celtic word crag refers to a rocky outcrop, rugged land.  Craig is a name derived from crag, though his most popular days are behind him.

Harlow – The Old English element haer means rock.  Harlow is originally a place name derived from haer, and it had some history of use as a boys’ name.  Today, though, Harlow is rising rapidly – for girls.

Langston – Langston literally means long stone, but he’s less rugged than many of these choices, thanks to poet Langston Hughes.

Winston – The -ston ending on lots of names can mean stone, and that seems to be the case for Winston.

Rocks That Could Make Good First Names

Flint – If Flynn follows Finn, could Flint ride both of their coattails?  Flint is a form of quartz that sparks when struck, and in the 1960s James Coburn played a JamesBond-parody character called Derek Flint.

Granite - Yes, it is a popular material for kitchen remodels.  But is Granite also a rock very much part of the natural world, favored by climbers from Yosemite to Patagonia

Jasper – Among the most stylish of the possibilities, Jasper is also a form of quartz.

Obsidian - Too much?  Maybe.  But if Jet, Orion and Gideon are wearable, Obsidian isn’t impossible.

Rock – Go with just Rock, and there’s no doubt.

Shale – Like Shane, he has a softer sound.  He’s not popular for children, but he’d be very wearable.

Slate – There’s something dramatic about a boy named Slate.  Blank slate, clean slate, the online magazine … There’s also surname Slater, an occupational name for someone who covered roofs with slate tile.

Stone – Nearly as obvious as Rock, but slightly more familiar thanks to anchorman Stone Phillips.

Names with element/sound

Jagger – I was convinced Jagger was related to jagged – rough, uneven – and that somehow it had something to do with rocks.  Turns out I was wrong.  Jagger is an occupational surname, another word for a peddler.  But just like Rocco doesn’t actually refer to a rock, I think Jagger’s sound puts him in this category – plus, there’s Mick Jagger, legendary frontman of the enduring rock band The Rolling Stones.

Rocco  – He’s a saintly Italian heritage pick that doesn’t actually mean rock – he comes from the Germanic element hrok - rest.  The saint was actually French, but the Feast of St. Rocco is associated with Italian immigrants in the US, thanks in part to traditional celebrations – and in part to a famous scene from The Godfather II.

Rocko – A respelling of Rocco, probably first worn by an animated wallaby in a Nickelodeon series from the 1990s, Rocko’s Modern Life.

Rockwell – Another surname possibility, Rockwell comes from the Old English element hroc - rook.  He seems like an unusual option, but Norman Rockwell makes him familiar.

What do you think of rock names for boys?  Are there any that you would use?  Have I left any off this list?

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{ 7 comments… read them below or add one }

Lola January 14, 2013 at 8:49 AM

The word Evan or Eben means Stone/Rock in Hebrew & both are great names!

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Julie January 5, 2013 at 5:30 PM

Jasper and Clay should be on the list.

I’ve seen Quarry and Kasota (a type of Limestone) in local BAs.

Jade has “gone to the girls”, but my Aunt used to babysit for a little boy named Jade, so in my mind it’s still male.

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appellationmountain January 5, 2013 at 7:06 PM

I know a grown up guy called Jade – it wears really well!

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Lyndsay January 5, 2013 at 12:53 PM

Love Rocco. Never thought of Rockwell, I kind of like that nn Rocky or Rocko. Rock alone is pretty cool too, but I wouldn’t use it. I would have to muster up a lot of courage, but I do think Dash, Flynn and Rocco would be so cute if we were ever to have another boy.

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Brea January 5, 2013 at 3:08 AM

My best friends brother’s first name is Rockford, though he goes by Rocky. I think that kind of qualifies. :P

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appellationmountain January 5, 2013 at 1:36 PM

Ooh … great addition to the list!

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Geek Names January 4, 2013 at 11:09 PM

One of the first things to pop into my mind is Mica.

I have a number of Coal miners in my family tree, so I always thought Cole was a nice nod to that.

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